Public Art in Developments

All multiple-dwelling, mixed-use or commercial developments, where the total cost exceeds $2 million, are required to provide public art as part of the development or alternatively, pay cash in lieu to the City. Find out more about this initiative below.

Public Art in Developments

We believe that public art can have a significant impact on the vibrancy, appearance, character and amenity of our neighbourhoods and actively encourage developers and builders to incorporate public art into their developments.

Under our Local Planning Policy 1.4, public art is a requirement for all multiple dwelling/houses, mixed use or non-residential developments (or alterations, additions or extensions to these developments) where the total development cost exceeds $2 million.

Applicants are required to provide artwork to the value of 1% of the development, or alternately pay cash in lieu of providing the artwork.

Process for Public Art in Development

Applicants that choose to provide public art will need to provide the details of their proposed artwork to our public art panel prior to their planning/development application being approved. Alternatively the details may be provided at a later date in accordance with a condition of planning/development approval.

We strongly encourage applicants to contact our arts team to discuss their proposed artwork for their development prior to lodging it for approval with our public art panel, as they can provide guidance and suggestions which align with our Public Art Strategy and Masterplan.

To submit your proposed artwork for approval to our public panel, download our Application for Public Artwork Approval Form and email it to arts@melville.wa.gov.au or post it to our Civic Centre. You will need to submit your application two weeks prior to an assessment meeting.

You will also need to notify us when the artwork is complete and installed, by completing our Notification of Artwork Completion Form.

For detailed requirements for public art provided under this policy, read our Local Planning Policy 1.14 – Provision of Public Art in Development Proposals.

Examples of Public Art Delivered Through Our Public Art Policy

  • ‘Flight’ by Mark Datodi. Commissioned by Megara. Budget: $30,000‘Flight’ by Mark Datodi. Commissioned by Megara. Budget: $30,000
  • ‘Meander’ by Alister Yiap at 4 Antony Street, Palmyra. Budget: $27,000.‘Meander’ by Alister Yiap at 4 Antony Street, Palmyra. Budget: $27,000.
  •  ‘Where the land meets the sea’ by Chris Nixon. Commissioned by Hawaiian Melville. Budget: $25,000.‘Where the land meets the sea’ by Chris Nixon. Commissioned by Hawaiian Melville. Budget: $25,000.
  • ‘Jacaranda’ by Paula Hart. Commissioned by Woolworths. Budget: $230,000.‘Jacaranda’ by Paula Hart. Commissioned by Woolworths. Budget: $230,000.
  • ‘Leaf Lines’ by Steve Tepper. Commissioned by Opal Aged Care, Alfred Cove. Budget: $245,000.‘Leaf Lines’ by Steve Tepper. Commissioned by Opal Aged Care, Alfred Cove. Budget: $245,000.
  • ‘We are Built Around People’ by Stormie Mills. Commissioned by Summit Homes. Budget: $150,000.‘We are Built Around People’ by Stormie Mills. Commissioned by Summit Homes. Budget: $150,000.
  • 66 Tain Street by Magali Dincher and Erik Guittiere. Budget: $60,00066 Tain Street by Magali Dincher and Erik Guittiere. Budget: $60,000
  • ‘Defender of the Empire and Commonwealth’ by Anne Neil. Commissioned by the Royal Australian Airforce Association - WA. Budget: $300,000.‘Defender of the Empire and Commonwealth’ by Anne Neil. Commissioned by the Royal Australian Airforce Association - WA. Budget: $300,000.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do you offer a discount if we opt for cash in lieu?

Yes we offer a discount of 15% for developments under the value of $10 million.

What is considered ‘public art’ for the purposes of this policy?

Our definition of public art is any work that is created by an artist and is sited in a visually accessible public location. It can include (but is not limited to):

  • The artistic treatment of functional equipment such as bike racks, benches, fountains, playground equipment, light posts or shade structures which are unique and produced by a professional artist.
  • Landscape art enhancements such as walkways, bridges or art features which are unique and produced by a professional artist.
  • Murals, tiles and mosaics covering walls, floors and walkways.
  • Sculptures, free-standing, wall supported or incorporated as an integral element of a buildings’ design.

Out definition of public art does not include:

  • Business logos. Artworks that include a business logo
  • Advertising signage. Commercial promotions in any form
  • Directional elements such as super graphics, signage or colour coding
  • Art objects which are mass produced or off-the-shelf reproductions
  • Landscaping or hardscaping which would normally be associated with the development
  • Services or utilities necessary to operate or maintain art works
Who is considered an artist for the purposes of this policy?

Our definition of artist is a person who fits into at least two of the following categories:

  • A person who has a tertiary qualification in the visual arts, or when the brief calls for it, other art forms such as multi media;
  • A person who has a history of exhibiting their artwork at reputable art galleries that sells the work of professional artists;
  • A person is represented in major public collections; and
  • A person who earns more than 50% of their income from arts related activities, such as teaching, selling artwork or undertaking public art commissions.

In some cases we may relax this definition where it may be specified for a particular project. For example, a project involving emerging artists, Indigenous artists, students or street/urban artists. No artist under consideration for a public art in developments project may have a relationship to the developer or have financial interest in the development.

 

How long will it take for you to review my public art proposal?

Our public art panel sits approximately every 2 months. Following the meeting, the applicant will be provided with an approval, a request for further information or a refusal.

What do you do with the money paid via cash in lieu?

All cash in lieu is put towards public art located in the neighbourhood where the development is located. We spend all the funds within five years of their recei

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