Heritage Listed Places

We have a Local Heritage Survey and Local Heritage list to help us recognise and protect the places of cultural and architectural heritage that makes our City unique. Find out more below.

Local Heritage Survey

The Local Heritage Survey is a document that refers to buildings and places which have cultural heritage significance and helps to tell our City’s stories. Every local government in Western Australia is required under the Heritage Act 2018 (WA) to have a Local Heritage Survey, which must be reviewed every five to eight years. The last review was in 2019.

Heritage List

We also have a Heritage List, which is part of our Local Planning Scheme No. 6 and comprises the most significant places on the Local Heritage Survey. Properties on the Heritage List have significant heritage value and may be worthy of protection or conservation.

Development and Building Approvals

There are no formal development restrictions for properties listed on our Local Heritage Survey. Owners are free to develop their properties in accordance with our Local Planning Scheme No. 6.

There are some restrictions for properties listed on our Local Heritage List and owners will need to submit a development application for most types of works. Development is not necessarily discouraged, we just want to ensure it is done well and respects the heritage value of the site.

If you have any questions about developing a place that’s on our Local Heritage Survey or Local Heritage List please contact us and ask to speak to our planning team.

Find a property on the Local Heritage Survey or Heritage List

Download our current Local Heritage Survey and Local Heritage List for full information about each listing.

You can also check out our heritage places on the interactive map below or download the full place records.

 

Nominating a Place for the Local Heritage Survey and Local Heritage List

We do a review of our Local Heritage Survey and Local Heritage List every five to eight years, which is when we will call for nominations from our community.

We then assess all nominations and if a place is considered worthy of potentially being heritage listed, we notify the owner and seek their consent to list the place on our Local Heritage Survey and/or Local Heritage List.

Once we have a draft of the reviewed Local Heritage Survey and Local Heritage List, we then engage with the community. That feedback is considered for a report which is presented to Council when the reviewed Survey and List is put to Council for adoption.

More detailed information about the nomination process will be provided in the lead up to the next review of the Local Heritage Survey and Local Heritage List, which will happen between 2024-2027.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a local heritage survey?

Every local government in Western Australia is required under the Heritage Act 2018 (WA) to prepare a list of places which, in the opinion of the local government, are of cultural heritage significance in the form of a Local Heritage Survey.

Local heritage surveys are compiled to tell the stories of their districts, however, do not serve as an instrument for control of development.

While a local heritage survey can make management recommendations there are no binding implications for owners who are free to develop their properties in accordance with the normal planning/development scheme provisions which apply to all properties in the City. 

What is a local heritage list?

Under the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015 (WA) each local government must maintain a local heritage list. The local heritage list comprises the most significant places on the local heritage survey and is associated with the statutory protection mechanisms of that City’s local planning scheme.

Planning/development approval is required for all development associated with properties on the local heritage list. This offers some level of protection; however, a wide range of development options remains possible for listed properties.

What is cultural heritage significance?

Cultural heritage significance is the aesthetic, historic, scientific or social significance a place may have for present and future generations. Cultural heritage extends beyond buildings and can include landscapes, artefacts and cultural institutes.  We recognize a broad

How often is the Local Heritage Survey reviewed?

The Heritage Council’s Guidelines for Local Heritage Surveys recommend periodic reviews of a local heritage survey every 5-8 years for local governments with ongoing urban development, such as our City. Our last review was in 2019 and therefore next review will commence around 2024.

Who can nominate a place for listing and what is the process?

Any member of the community can nominate a place for inclusion on our Local Heritage Survey. We put out a call for public nominations each time we review the plan, however, if you have a place you would like to nominate outside of the review period please get in touch with our planning team.

Can a place be listed on the Local Heritage Survey or Local Heritage List without the owner’s consent?

We won’t usually list a place if the owner objects, with the only exceptions being for places of exceptional heritage significance.

We have adopted an open and transparent approach to our Local Heritage Survey, consulting with all affected owners.

There are many stages in the consultation prior to a place being listed. Owners of properties proposed for listing are individually consulted, and the wider community is consulted more broadly. Councillors then examine the issues raised during consultation and make decisions on whether to list a place on the Local Heritage Survey and/or the Local Heritage List.

What about the State Register of Heritage Places?

Just as the listing of a place in our Local Heritage Survey is recognition of the importance of a place to the local district, the listing of a place on the state register recognises the significance of a place to the whole of the state of Western Australia. 

Only places of exceptional value are recognised on the state register.  Local examples include Heathcote, the Applecross District Hall, Wireless Hill Park and the Miller Bakehouse. 

The development and even the maintenance of state registered places are carefully guided by the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage. While this sounds onerous to some at first, there are many benefits for owners, including significantly higher property values, and the prestige associated with owning buildings of recognised heritage value.

The state register is administered by the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage and is a process completely independent from the City. The Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage determines the suitability a nominated place for inclusion on the state register. 

It is possible for a place to be listed in our Local Heritage Survey, our planning scheme, and on the state register at the same time

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