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Meet Loki, the Therapy Dog

Loki is a beautiful Kelpie x who has been rescued from SAFE Bunbury. Along with Tara, she will be undergoing specialist training in Melbourne under the guidance of the experts at Lead the Way. This training will certify Loki as an Animal Assisted Therapy Dog. Upon returning to Perth Loki will be fully qualified to work (using the important bond between humans and dogs) helping people with disabilities, people living with mental illness, and the elderly in the City of Melville (where we live). They will speak at high schools, community groups (such as Melville Cares, Rotary, Palmyra Together) and primary schools to raise awareness about Mental Health and promote the importance of community. They will also visit hospitals (such as Fiona Stanley and St John of God Murdoch), Youth Centres (such as Willagee Community Centre), Elderly Homes (such as Aegis Aged Care, Opal Applecross and Melville Cares), as well as private clients within The City of Melville.

This kind of therapy is extremely popular and successful in the United States and Europe, however is very rare in Australia - a situation Loki and Tara hope to change. Animal Assisted Therapy focuses on reducing stress, raising awareness for mental health, promoting community inclusion, and working towards helping people live a more fulfilling life. Tara is a qualified Disability Support Worker and is currently studying to be a qualified Mental Health Worker. Tara and Loki will work together to help those in the community and will strive to change the City of Melville for the better one paw print at a time.

Project Updates

Changing the world one paw at a time

If you voted for Loki the Therapy Dog, you'd be happy to know that, together with Tara Lord, he's been busy changing the world, one paw at a time.

Here's an article in the Melville Times from November 2017, written by Bryce Luff who caught up with Tara and Loki.

APPLECROSS resident Tara Lord says she and her kelpie-cross Loki have plans to “change the world one paw print at a time”.

The 19-year-old adopted Loki from a dog shelter in February.

“When we found Loki she was perfect. I think it was meant to be, like it was planned for us,” she said.

Miss Lord is a qualified disability support and mental health worker, studying youth work and has plans to complete a double major in counselling and social work in 2019.

She and her two-year-old companion recently flew to Melbourne to complete training at Lead the Way, an organisation dedicated to providing animal-assisted therapy.

The trip provided both with new skills, with Loki now certified for animal-assisted therapy.

Through Healthcare Australia, Ms Lord and Loki will soon be regulars at homeless shelters, women’s refuges, family group homes, aged care facilities and mental health facilities, providing comfort and assistance where they can.

“The work we do is very person-centred, it’s whatever the client wants and it’s individualised which I think is what makes it so special,” she said.

“If the client just wants to cuddle with the dog they can.” 

Read the full article: Melville Times

Loki The Therapy Dog Making News!

Tara Lord and Loki the Therapy Dog from Project Robin Hood's successful projects have been making news!

Here's an article in the West Australian from February 2018, written by Clair Tyrrell

"Loki may have been rescued as a young dog but now the roles have been reversed.

The kelpie cross is a therapy dog and with her owner Tara Lord, Loki has helped several West Australians get the most out of life.

Ms Lord, 19, uses Loki when working with disabled and autistic youth, victims of trauma, people in foster care and with a mental illness.​"

Read the full article: West Australian

  • Loki and Tara Lord - Image by the Bryce Luff, Meville TimesLoki and Tara Lord - Image by the Bryce Luff, Meville Times
  • Loki and Tara Lord - Image by the Bryce Luff, Meville TimesLoki and Tara Lord - Image by the Bryce Luff, Meville Times
  • Young man patting Loki the Therapy Dog
  • Young man with Loki the Therapy Dog taking a selfie

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