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Safe Active Streets

Safe Active Streets

Ongoing

We are creating safe active streets and comfortable riding environments for bike riders with all levels of experience. Tell us what you think of the proposed SAS design.

Last Updated: 30 May 2019 Follow Engagement

Community Involvement

Before a detailed design could be developed it was important for the City of Melville and Department of Transport to consider the needs of people most likely to be impacted by the proposed route of the Safe Active Street and it's construction.

We asked residents, people who used the route or go to school to place a pin on an interactive map showing the route of the Safe Active Street and share any comments they had. The community were also invited to attend a workshop co-hosted by the Department of Transport so share the community's feedback and focus on commonly identified matters that could inform design changes.

We engaged with:

  • People who live or own property along the route 
  • Businesses along the safe active street
  • Residents living close to zones of new embayed parking
  • Residents living close to the intersections where there would be a road priority change
  • The school communities of Applecross SHS and Ardross Primary School.
Map of what the community told us about the proposed route

Engagement Results

You told us what matters to you along the proposed Safe Active Street and we now have a real understanding of what is important to you all.

Interactive Map:

Participants’ thoughts and feelings about the Safe Active Street proposal obtained via the interactive map were analysed using qualitative data techniques which showed four common themes:

  • Questions
  • Existing problems relating to safety
  • Consequences identified 
  • Suggestions for improvement

Workshop:

The purpose of the Community Workshop was to involve residents who live along the proposed route in the concept design process.

It was also an opportunity to:

  • To see how their feedback had informed the partners of their views
  • To meet and hear from people in the partnership team
  • To ask questions.

Read the Engagement Results Report

About the Engagement

Background

The proposed route for the safe active streets encompasses:

  • Links Road
  • Collier Road south of Millington Street
  • Millington Street east of Collier Road
  • Hope Road north of Millington Street
  • Willcock Street

This route was chosen because it is already a defined, active link between Garden City Shopping Centre and Riseley Street Activity Centre. It also passes by Applecross Senior High School and Ardross Primary School, helping to create a safer, slow speed environment that encourages students to walk and cycle to school.

History - Artist impressions and concept drawings

The impetus for the safe active streets originated with the redevelopment of Garden City and the subsequent upgrading of the surrounding road network. The artistic impressions were commissioned in 2012. Connecting Garden City to the Riseley Street Activity Centre became a reality in 2015-2016. This coupled with the Department of Transport’s focus on creating slower speed environments for cyclists and pedestrians, that connect to the wider cycling/pedestrian network encompassing areas of commercial activity, education and public transport hubs, provided the catalyst to push ahead with the Links Road Safe Active Streets project.

  • Historical concept artwork for major pedestrian connecting routeHistorical concept artwork for major pedestrian connecting route
  • Historical concept artwork proposed view toward Almondbury Road at Garden CityHistorical concept artwork proposed view toward Almondbury Road at Garden City
  • Historical concept artwork for wider pathway to school for bike and pedestrian accessHistorical concept artwork for wider pathway to school for bike and pedestrian access
  • Historical concept artwork for promenade seating and rain garden edge treatmentHistorical concept artwork for promenade seating and rain garden edge treatment
  • Historical concept artwork for corner of Links Road & Leverburgh Street seating and planting conceptsHistorical concept artwork for corner of Links Road & Leverburgh Street seating and planting concepts
  • Historical concept artwork for public amenity and artwork on Links RoadHistorical concept artwork for public amenity and artwork on Links Road

Timeline

  • October - November 2018
  • Community Engagement
    Online community feedback on proposed design and community workshop
  • January - February 2019
  • Design (15%)
  • January - February 2019
  • Road Safety Audit
    Preliminary Design
  • March - April 2019
  • Preliminary Design (85%) Review
  • March 2019
  • Community Update
    Informing the community about the outcomes and next steps
  • May 2019
  • Road Safety Audit
    Detailed Design
  • May 2019
  • Detailed Design (100%) Completion
  • March - April 2019
  • MRWA Approval
  • November Council Meeting 2019
  • Council approval to progress to construction
  • Community Update
    Council approval and construction dates Prior to construction
  • June 2020
  • Construction Completion
  • July 2020
  • Road Safety Audit
    Pre-opening
  • August 2020
  • Project Completion

How We Engaged with You

Who did we engage with?

We contacted:

  • People who live or own property along the route affected by the safe active streets project along Almondbury Rd, Links Rd, Collier St, Millington St, Hope Road and Willcock St.
  • Businesses along the safe active streets
  • Residents living close to zones of new embayed parking
  • Residents living close to the intersections where there will be a road priority change
  • The school communities of Applecross SHS and Ardross Primary School

Letters were sent and signage was displayed along the route.

How could people get involved?

There were two major opportunities for community participation.

  • On Melville Talks, people were able to place a pin on an interactive map showing the route of the Safe Active Street and share any comments they may have. 
  • By attending a community workshop co-hosted by the Department of Transport and the City of Melville, the workshop program included a presentation on the community’s feedback and focus on commonly identified matters that could inform design changes.
What happened with the information on the interactive map?

It was used to provide a visual representation about how the streets are currently used by local people as a point of reference for the project team.

It also helped the project team to mitigate potential disruptions to everyday life in the short term and consider what should be retained, replaced or enhanced on the streets in the long term.

What happens next?

The data will be analysed and report will be submitted to Council.

The final detailed design will then be developed, taking into consideration community feedback, and made available for public comment before referral to Council for endorsement.

If approved, construction will begin in 2019-2020, with the project fully-funded by the Department of Transport through their Safe Active Streets Program, with ongoing maintenance included in the City’s standard asset maintenance schedules, which is not expected to cost more than maintaining a normal road.

Any feedback provided by the community will be posted on Melville Talks.

What is a Safe Active Street?

The City of Melville has received funding from the Department of Transport to create a series of safe active streets linking Garden City Shopping Centre and Riseley Street Activity Centre. Safe active streets are local streets with few cars, traveling at low speeds that prioritise bicycling and enhance conditions for walking. They are an important, new part of Perth’s transport network offering safe and comfortable routes for people riding bikes and walking.

FAQs

1. Who will benefit from the safe active streets?

Safe active streets aim to make streets safer for everyone and are a convenient, easy and sociable way to get around. They are designed to create comfortable environments for road users with all levels of experience. Safe active streets allow mums, dads, children, senior citizens and others to make short trips on bikes to schools, parks, shops or visiting neighbours. They also have additional tree plantings to provide a shady and cooler street for street users. Aside from the improved visual appeal of the street, more local people will be using the street increasing the natural surveillance in the area and improving community connections.

2. How does the Safe Active Streets Project fit into the State’s transport network?

Perth has all the ingredients needed for a great cycling and walking city – a warm climate, flat topography and outstanding natural beauty.

As the city’s population increases and more people live near centres of activity, walking and cycling can play a big part in helping to reduce congestion, improve air quality, support local business and encourage a healthy, active lifestyle.

The Transport Portfolio’s Cycling Network Plan prepared as part of Transport @ 3.5 Million - the Perth and Peel transport plan for 3.5 million people and beyond ensures more emphasis is being placed on providing high quality, safe and comfortable cycling infrastructure that is integrated with public transport services.

There are a number of different types of cycling infrastructure that contribute to the make-up of the cycling network including on-road paths, off-road paths, lake and river crossings and safe active streets.

The Plan is available on the Department of Transport’s website.

3. How is the project being funded?

The project is being funded by the Department of Transport’s Safe Active Streets Program. More information about this program can be found on the Department of Transport’s website.

4. Will there be any inconvenience to the residents along the proposed safe active street?

Yes, there will be some inconvenience during the construction stages, however it is not anticipated that there will be any inconvenience once the works have been completed. This project aims to increase residential amenity by creating a quieter and safer environment.

5. Why change the street for bikes? People can ride if they want to now

International research has shown that more people will ride bikes when they feel safe, and that bike routes on streets where speeds are slowed to 30 km/h are recommended to maximise safety and increase bike riding.

The Department of Transport is working with local government authorities to deliver a plan across Perth which will connect up a network of bike-friendly routes – safe active streets form part of this network.

6. Will there be big groups of fast cyclists riding down the street?

Not likely. The proposed roads do not form part of a designated route for established group rides, which typically use more direct major roads. Safe active streets are ideal for slow speed riding.

The street context and design, including raised intersections and slow points will not encourage groups of fast moving recreational cyclists.

7. How will people know they are on a safe active street?

When entering the street, blue-and-white safe active street road patches, 30 km/h speed limit signs and raised intersections help to slow traffic and alert people that they are in a bicycle and pedestrian friendly space.

Along the route, bike symbols and red pavement are used to mark out the safe active street and suggest where bikes should ride.

8. How will you make traffic slow down?

The speed limit along the safe active street is set at 30 km/h. Treatments, including raised intersections and slow points, are capable of changing the road environment so that motorists are only capable of driving at a maximum speed of 30 km/h.

9. Can cars pass people riding bikes?

Yes, as per WA road rules a driver may overtake a person riding a bike if there is enough space to do so safely, they have a clear view of the road ahead and they do not exceed the 30 km/h speed limit.

The State Government has recently introduced new minimum passing distance laws to protect people riding bikes, who are one of our most vulnerable road users. A driver of a motor vehicle must pass a bike travelling in the same direction at a safe distance – that safe distance being 1 metre on roads where the posted speed limit is 60 km/h or less. More information relating to these recently introduced laws can be found on the Road Safety Commission’s website.

Situational examples of how-to-use safe active streets are also available on the Department of Transport website.

10. Will there be an impact on existing on-road parking?

While the availability of unrestricted on-street parking will be affected, the City of Melville has, and will continue to work actively with residents to ensure their parking requirements are met.

11. What will it mean to surrounding streets?

The roads encompassing the proposed route are local access roads and most traffic is local in origin. As the existing traffic volume is low, it is not expected that there will be a redistribution of traffic to the surrounding streets.

12. Will a safe active street discourage rat running?

The safe active street treatment will discourage through or non-local traffic as it will be difficult to travel above 30 km/h. While the route provides a direct link to local attractions and other bike routes, it has been selected partly because it is not major route for vehicle traffic.

13. Does this mean the street will be narrower? Will tradespeople renovating houses and installing swimming pools be able to access the street?

The width of the street remains the same as it was previously (except at the slow points). Access for tradespeople and everyone else is the same.

14. Are the slow points in the concept plan finalised, or can they be changed?

Slow point locations are proposed, and residents are asked to provide comments on these locations.

15. How do buses fit in?

The Department of Transport has worked with the Public Transport Authority to ensure that school bus services operating along the safe active streets route continue as normal.

16. Will emergency access change (fire, ambulance etc.)?

The Department of Transport has worked with emergency services to ensure that there is no impact to their services.

17. Why will the speed limit be set at 30km/h? With school zones nearby, the speeds change and it will be confusing. Does the 30km/h apply permanently?

The speed limit will be set at 30 km/h for the entire route at all times, which will support the design of the safe active street.

Research of international best practice indicates that 30 km/h is a safe speed for bicycles and cars to share the road space. By applying traffic calming measures to achieve a self-enforcing 30km/h speed limit, the safe active street will provide a safer, more comfortable environment for the community.

18. Will rubbish trucks still be able to empty our bins?

Yes – the City of Melville will ensure this is not impacted, and will determine whether any changes to rubbish truck times are required (e.g. if there is a need to avoid peak commute times).

19. How will the City encourage people to ride their bikes more for local trips?

The City of Melville and Department of Transport hope to see more people riding their bikes, enjoying the safe active street and engaging with others and their surroundings as they make their way to school, the shops or the train station.

A range of activities, including local events, engagement with schools and workplaces and discussions with local businesses are planned. Please let us know if you would like to be involved by calling the City of Melville on 9364 0666.

Burning questions from the workshop

1. Do the local community support this initiative?

The local community has been informed of this project and most people that have contacted us are supportive with some reservations. We have had a few people who are categorically opposed.

2. How has the significant increase in both road and pedestrian traffic at school drop off and pick up been considered and addressed?

The purpose of the Safe Active Street is to increase the number of students walking and cycling to school, therefore reducing the number of parents at drop off and pick up times.

3. Why parking on west side of links road?

The additional parking was to offset any loss on Links Road, but on further reflection extra parking on the west side of Links Rd and Alexander Rd will not be necessary as there is additional parking on Leverburgh St and Grimsay Rd.

4. What ranger follow up be arranged to help change behaviour regarding parking?

Part of the whole process will be to educate the community including the schools on how to utilise the Safe Active Street. There will also be an activation period involving the local and school communities encouraging active use of the streets with much less emphasis on motorised vehicle use. During the activation period the City of Melville Rangers will be on hand to help with the education and infringe if necessary.

5. What about Collier/Milliton intersection control when turning?

The raised platform will slow vehicular traffic. There will be advance warning signs indicating the imminent start of a Safe Active Street.

6. Will it be more difficult to turn into my driveway? Or onto the front lawn?

Access to property's driveways and front lawns will not be affected.

7. What do people want from their street? A safe space to walk/ride to local places? More trees?

Associated with the Safe Active Street will be a significant increase in trees and plantings together with street art and street furniture.

8. Do you expect the route to divert vehicle traffic to Drew and Hope roads and what options are available to avoid it before it happens?

The roads encompassing the proposed route are local access roads and most traffic is local in origin. As the existing traffic volume is low, it is not expected that there will be a redistribution of traffic to the surrounding streets. Control sites in the City of Vincent and City of Bayswater have shown little to no change in traffic in surrounding streets as a result of the Safe Active Street. There may be some diversion of traffic but the City will include extra speed platforms along Drew and Hope Road to mitigate speeding vehicles.

9. Will traffic be inclined to use quieter streets to avoid I.e links road

The roads encompassing the proposed route are local access roads and most traffic is local in origin. As the existing traffic volume is low, it is not expected that there will be a redistribution of traffic to the surrounding streets. Control sites in the City of Vincent and City of Bayswater have shown little to no change in traffic in surrounding streets as a result of the Safe Active Street.

10. Pedestrian access to Wireless Hill is not being addressed as part of this project

Pedestrian access to Wireless Hill is not a part of the project but the City is aware of the need to make a safer walking environment to and from Wireless Hill. The City will address the need for safer walking routes at a later stage and community consultation will take place.

11. Future plan connecting this road to garden city upgrade and connecting to the river?

The link from Garden City to Links Road is part of a much bigger plan to provide safe walking and cycling routes to the river. At this stage a link across Canning Hwy at the Riseley St intersection and then along Mcleod Rd via the coffee strip and down Ardross St to the river is being mooted.

12. Will there be a reduction in the number of parking bays from what is currently available on Links Rd?

There will be less parking bays on Links Road but this will be offset by more car bays on Leverburgh St and Grimsay Road

13. How will heavy school traffic morning and afternoon be managed effectively?

The amount of school traffic will stay the same or be reduced, as some students will opt to walk and ride to school. There will be additional parking installed on Leverburgh Street and Grimsay Road to offset any loss of parking on Links Road. There is also a Student drop off on Ardessie Street that will be installed over the school holidays. The Applecross Senior High School staff will efficiently patrol this. Vehicles will move through the drop off area once the student is picked up or dropped off and parking will be prohibited.

14. Will congestion be an issue with the one way points?

The City is currently reviewing the use of one way or narrow points. Slow points on Links Road are to reduce the speed to 30Km/hr and increase the safety of all users. The distance between slow point is approximately 80m to achieve this speed reduction.

15. How will cyclists be made to feel safe on the route?

The road speed will be reduced to 30Km/hr and vehicles will only pass a cyclist if is safe to do so. There are a number of traffic calming measures and signage to achieve this.

16. Will I still be able to move my caravan after the road modifications?

Yes

17. A clear objective and direction to assist with productive design outcome

Most certainly, this is why we involve the use of the Department of Transport, Main Roads WA, key consulting groups and our own very experienced in-house design team.

18. Is the route fixed, and if so was Drew Road considered as an alternative to Millington St?

Yes. Drew Road was initially considered together with the entire length of Hope Rd. After much deliberation, investigation and peer review from the Department of Transport and key consulting groups Millington and a portion of Hope Rd were chosen owing to the steep gradient on Hope Road, the quiet nature of Millington St and the need for a footpath.

19. Will the route eventually connect to the river?

Yes. The link from Garden City to Links Road is part of a much bigger plan to provide safe walking and cycling routes to the river. At this stage a link across Canning Hwy at the Riseley St intersection and then along Mcleod Rd via the coffee strip and down Ardross St to the river is being mooted.

20. Where are all cars dropping kids at school going to access the area / park?

There is no reduction in the amount of parking bays only their distribution around the schools.

21. How do you know this project will achieve its objectives and not cause unintended problems for residents?

The roads encompassing the proposed route are local access roads and most traffic is local in origin. As the existing traffic volume is low, it is not expected that there will be a redistribution of traffic to the surrounding streets. Control sites in the City of Vincent and City of Bayswater have shown little to no change in traffic in surrounding streets as a result of the Safe Active Street. It is unlikely to get significantly more people parking on it due to the location away from the schools, likely it will be residents using the parking provided as part of the Safe Active Street. The total outcome of this change is to increase safety for all users and reduce speed in the street.

22. Have any pedestrian and cycling counts /studies been undertaken to establish the priority movements of people in this Ardross area as we have dominant movements to and from the high school on Alexander Rd?

Yes and there were before surveys done on cycling and pedestrian activity. Alexander Rd does have a footpath and can be traffic calmed if necessary.

23. If the project does not go ahead are there any plans for traffic calming/improving sidewalks on links road?

At this stage the project is going ahead and had full Council approval.

24. What is going to be done to stop the rat run on the portion of Hope Rd to the South of Millington? We have already had a death on the street so we don't want another one!!!!

Traffic calming using speed plateaus will be installed.

25. If the purpose of the project is to link Garden City with the Riseley centre, why do we need to link them?

The Safe Active Street link is part of a bigger plan to provide safer pedestrian and cycling routes with in our suburbs. The link from Garden City to the Riseley Centre is part of the Department of Transport's Long term Cycling Network. The route forms part of a bigger network which in this instance connects to the river. There will be more people living in this area with the increase in apartments and subdivisions. The City is committed to helping people make choices about their travel modes and increase the use of active transport. The route identified is also in need of resurfacing; creating the Safe Active Street is a way to achieve this and will be paid for by the state government. The route also passes two schools and as stated earlier provide an active transport link for students.

The Long Term Cycle Network aims to improve connectivity of the current cycling network and ensure that future projects are delivered in a cohesive manner. Once complete, the LTCN will provide a centralised, holistic network for the Perth and Peel region.

It is important to note that the LTCN will represent the aspirational cycling network across Perth and Peel and will not constitute a firm commitment from LGAs or DoT to deliver the identified network, nor will it identify prioritisation or timelines for the delivery of projects/routes. It will be a live network and subject to refinements and changes as required.

26. Traffic counts along the Safe Active Street Route

A number of residents at the recent community workshop asked what the average traffic counts were along the proposed route.

Below are the latest figures for each location along the route.

LocationAverage week day traffic85% speed km/h*
Links Road1388-172452-51
Millington Street25248
Collier Street36939
Hope Road37147
Searle Road39850
McCallum Crescent533-179752-44
Drew Road97352
Leverburgh Street72946

What is the 85% speed km/h?

The 85th percentile speed is a widely used traffic statistical metric. It provides an accurate estimation of traffic conditions and helps identify poor road design and unfitting speed limits.

The 85th percentile speed is the pace adopted by reasonable people, according to each road environment. We assume that most drivers are prudent while trying to reach their destination as fast as possible.

Also called the “operating speed”, this parameter can be seen as the maximal safe speed for travelling at a certain location. However, it should NOT be confused with the speed limits indicated by road signs.

Contact us

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City of Melville

Ruth Behn - TravelSmart Officer (Engineering) 

ruth.behn@melville.wa.gov.au

Department of Transport

DoT Cycling Team

cycling@transport.wa.gov.au

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