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Local Heritage Survey

Local Heritage Survey

Ongoing

We asked for your feedback about the four new nominations and the Draft Local Heritage Survey 2019.

Last Updated: 5 December 2019 Follow Engagement

Community Involvement

We asked the community to help tell the story of the City of Melville by nominating places of aesthetic, historic, scientific or social significance to be included on the City’s Local Heritage Survey. Four new nominations were received and the complete Draft Local Heritage Survey 2019 was available for community comment.

Updated periodically as per the Heritage Act 1990, the City’s Local Heritage Survey is a catalogue of building and places that have cultural heritage significance. The City recognises a broad scope of listings, from landscape features and parks to historic buildings or structures.

A revised list of places that are deemed to have cultural heritage significance to the local area, including four new nominations, has been compiled for inclusion in the Survey.

New Places Nominated for Consideration by Council

Lemon Scented Gum Trees at Tompkins Park

Read the place record to find out more

Melville Bowling and Recreation Club

Read the place record to find out more

House – 211 Forrest Street, Palmyra

Read the place record to find out more

About the Engagement

The Local Heritage Survey (formerly known as a Municipal Inventory or a Municipal Heritage Inventory) is a document that refers to buildings and places which have cultural heritage significance. Every local government in Western Australia is required under Part 8 of the Heritage of Western Australia Act 2018 to have a Local Heritage Survey, which must be reviewed and updated every four 5-8 years.

A sub-list of the Local Heritage Survey is our Heritage List. The Heritage List identifies building and places from our Local Heritage Survey with more cultural heritage significance, and buildings or places on this sub-list require a development application for most works.

The purpose of both the Local Heritage Survey and Heritage List is not to protect or conserve these places, but simply to capture stories and our City’s history. Owners with properties on either list are welcome to develop their properties, but if on the Heritage List just need to submit a development application first. 

  • Examples of buildings of cultural heritage significanceExamples of buildings of cultural heritage significance
  • Example of a house of cultural heritage significanceExample of a house of cultural heritage significance

Timeline

  • 13 May 2019 – 21 June 2019
  • Public call for nominations
  • May/June 2019
  • Review text of existing inventory/survey
  • July/August 2019
  • Assess nominations
  • September 2019
  • Prepare Draft 2019 Local Heritage Survey
  • November/ December 2019
  • Advertise Draft 2019 Local Heritage Survey
  • 7 November 2019 to 5 December 2019
  • Community Comment
    Four new nominations and the complete Draft Local Heritage Survey 2019 open for comment
  • February 2020
  • Adoption of Final 2019 Local Heritage Survey by Council

How We Engaged with You

Who did we engage with?

Nominations

  • We engaged widely with the community including residents, ratepayers and Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander people to review the Local Heritage Survey.
  • A random sample of residents and ratepayers in the City of Melville also received a direct invitation to participate.

Feedback on nominations and the Draft Local Heritage Survey 2019

Using social media, a newspaper advertorial and an email to the original random sample of residents and ratepayers we asked for feedback on the four nominations and the Draft Local Heritage Survey 2019.

How could people get involved?
  • Direct emails were sent to a random sample of residents and ratepayers to ask for their feedback via Melville Talks
  • On Melville Talks, the community could complete a nomination of a place with heritage value
  • After the nominations were submitted the community can provide feedback on the four nominations and the Draft Local Heritage Survey 2019 on Melville Talks.

FAQs

What will happen with our nominations?

The nominations shared by the community were reviewed by our project team and the owner of the property will need to give their consent prior to listing on the Heritage List.

 

What happens after nominations?

Successful nominations will be listed on the Local Heritage Survey. If you miss out on nominations this year don't worry we will be reviewing the document again in another 5-8 years.

What’s a Local Heritage Survey?

Local Heritage Surveys (formerly known as Local Government Inventories, Municipal Inventories or Municipal Heritage Inventories) are buildings or places which, in the opinion of the local government, are of cultural heritage significance.

Local Heritage Surveys can help us work with private owners to manage heritage places. Surveys are complied to “tell the stories” of their districts, rather than serve as blunt instruments for control of development.

What’s Cultural Heritage Significance?

Cultural Heritage Significance is the aesthetic, historic, scientific or social significance a place may have for present and future generations. Cultural heritage extends beyond buildings and can include landscapes, artefacts and cultural institutes. We recognize a broad scope of listings, from landscape features and parks to historic buildings or structures.

Why is the City preparing a Local Heritage Survey?

Every local government in Western Australia is required under Part 8 of the Heritage Act 2018 to prepare a list of places of local heritage significance. The Heritage Council ‘Guidelines for Local Heritage Surveys’  recommend period reviews of the Local Heritage Survey every 5-8 years for local governments with ongoing urban development such as the City of Melville. As our last such document dates to 2014, it’s time for us to prepare an updated version.

What’s the difference between the Local Heritage Survey and the Heritage List?

Surveys are complied to “tell the stories” of their districts, rather than serve as instruments for control of development.

A survey makes management recommendations. There are no binding implications for owners, who are free to develop their properties in accordance with the normal planning scheme provisions which apply to all properties in the City.

As part of the listing process, the history of each place is carefully researched. You may find out some interesting things about your property should it be included!

The Heritage List is different. This list is part of the City’s planning scheme and it comprises the best of places in the Local Heritage Survey. Properties on the Heritage List have significant heritage value and are worthy of some protection. A wide range of development options remains possible under these listings.

Only fully informed and consenting owners would have properties listed in the scheme.

Swipe to see more

Swipe to see more
 Local Heritage SurveyHeritage List
Heritage Management RecommendationsYesYes
Need for formal Development ApplicationNot beyond normal requirementsYes for some works such as demolition
Funding/subsidiesNoNo
Free development advice from heritage specialistPossible by appointmentPossible by appointment
What if I would like to see the heritage qualities of my property better protected?

You should consider nominating your place for the Heritage List.

Registering a property on the Local Heritage Survey or Heritage List is a great opportunity for owners to learn more about the history of their property while also helping capture the stories of the City to help build a sense of community. As part of the listing process, the history of each place is carefully researched by a heritage expert, and owners can receive free advice on restoring and/or improving the property if it interests them.

What about the State Register of Heritage Places?

Just as the listing of a place in the Local Heritage Survey is recognition of the importance of a place to the local district, the listing of a place on the State Register recognises the significance of a place to the whole of the state of Western Australia.

Only places of exceptional value in fine condition are recognised on the State Register. Local examples include Heathcote, the Applecross District Hall, Wireless Hill Park and the Miller Bakehouse.

The development and even the maintenance of State Registered places are carefully guided by the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage. While this sounds onerous to some at first, there are many benefits for owners, including significantly higher property values, and the prestige associated with owning buildings of recognised heritage value.

The State Register of Heritage Places is administered by the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage. Completely independent from the City, this department determines the suitability a nominated place for inclusion on the State Register.

It’s entirely possible for a place to be listed in the Local Heritage Survey, the City’s planning scheme, and on the State Register at the same time.

Can a place be listed in the Local Heritage Survey without the owner’s consent?

No, the City won’t usually list a place if the owner objects. The only exceptions are for places of exceptional heritage significance.

Having said that, there’s no need to fear a listing should it be suggested as there are no formal development restrictions that follow from the Local Heritage Survey. Indeed, a listing may well be the perfect opportunity for an owner to learn more about the history of his or her property, and receive free of charge, expert guidance in its restoration and/or improvement!

The City of Melville has adopted an open and transparent approach to the Local Heritage Survey, consulting with all affected owners.

There are many stages in consultation. Owners of properties proposed for listing are individually consulted, and the wider community is consulted more broadly. Councillors will examine the issues raised during consultation and make decisions if necessary.

Who can nominate a place for listing and what is the process?

Any member of the community can nominate a place for inclusion on the Local Government Inventory. Just be sure to reach us by 21 June 2019.

Your submission does not need to be more than a paragraph or two. Start with your full name, and your interest in the place you’re nominating. Are you the owner, for example?

We’ll also need the address of the place, plus a short description of it. The best submissions give us a sense of why the place might have heritage significance to the area. Here’s an example:

I’m JC Smith, owner of the dwelling at 299 Sample Street, Sampleton. My house dates to the 1920s and is in excellent condition, with most of the original materials intact. Our records show that the house originally belonged to Mr Bignotes, who owned the general store on nearby Corner Street for 30 years.

Should a place be considered significant, the City of Melville will contact the owner of the place nominated and seek their consent to list.

Once the public consultation period is closed and further research is complete, a final version of the Local Heritage Survey and Heritage List will be put to Council for adoption.

We’ll then make the final Local Heritage Survey available for public perusal at the Civic Centre and at our libraries. A copy of the survey is also forwarded to the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage.

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