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Heritage Listed Places

The Local Heritage Survey (formerly known as the Local Government Inventory, Municipal Inventory or a Municipal Heritage Inventory) is a document that refers to buildings and places which have cultural heritage significance. Every local government in Western Australia is required under Heritage of Western Australia 2018 to have a Local Heritage Survey, which must be reviewed periodically.

What’s important to note is there are no formal development restrictions for properties listed on the Local Heritage Survey. Owners are free to develop their properties in accordance with normal planning scheme provisions which apply to all properties in the City.

In saying that, the City does have a Heritage List, which is part of our Planning Scheme and comprises the best places on the Local Heritage Survey. Properties on the Heritage List have significant heritage value and may be worthy of conservation. For these properties, the City will work together with property owners and developers to ensure the best outcome for everyone. Development is not necessarily discouraged, we just want to ensure it is done well and in a way that respects the heritage qualities of the site.

If you have any questions about developing a place that’s on the survey or heritage list please contact a Senior Planning Officer on 9364 0225.

Local Heritage Survey List

Draft Local Hertiage Survey Places and Heritage List

Document nameDownloadable files
Draft Local Heritage Survey 2019PDF - 2.0MB
Draft Local Heritage Survey 2019 – Final Place Records [All]PDF - 10.0MB
New Nomination - Lemon Scented Gum TreesPDF - 183.5KB
New Nomination - Melville Bowling and Recreation ClubPDF - 168.3KB
New Nomination - Ardross HostelPDF - 609.0KB
New Nomination - House 211 Forrest StPDF - 259.2KB
Heritage Property - Atwell House Arts CentrePDF - 144.6KB
Heritage Property - Alfred Cove ReservePDF - 130.5KB
Heritage Property - House BictonPDF - 1.0MB
Heritage Property - Swan Estuary Marine ParkPDF - 103.1KB
Heritage Property - Applecross Jetty Point Dundas BoardwalkPDF - 439.8KB
Heritage Property - Lemon Scented Gum TreePDF - 89.7KB
Heritage Property - Applecross RSL Memorial HallPDF - 128.2KB
Heritage Property - Applecross Primary SchoolPDF - 269.5KB
Heritage Property - St Geroge's ChurchPDF - 167.3KB
Heritage Property - Applecross District HallPDF - 130.8KB
Heritage Property - Raffles HotelPDF - 157.9KB
Heritage Property - German Jetty SitePDF - 125.8KB
Heritage Property - Charabanc Terminus SitePDF - 134.6KB
Heritage Property - Coffee Point Boatyard / Slipway / Wharf SitePDF - 140.5KB
Heritage Property - Canning BridgePDF - 188.6KB
Heritage Property - Jacaranda and Plane Street TreesPDF - 98.4KB
Heritage Property - Point Heathcote Lower LandPDF - 212.6KB
Heritage Property - South of Perth Yacht ClubPDF - 173.2KB
Heritage Property - Wireless Hill Park, Museum, Four Houses, Heritage Trails, Moreton Bay Fig Tree and Eucalyptus TreePDF - 601.0KB
Heritage Property - Lemon Scented Gum Tree AR10PDF - 95.3KB
Heritage Property - Mitchell Street, Street Scar TreePDF - 87.0KB
Heritage Property - Applecross Senior High SchoolPDF - 233.9KB
Heritage Property - Pine TreesPDF - 77.9KB
Heritage Property - Santa Maria College Administration Building and ChapelPDF - 165.8KB
Heritage Property - Attadale Reserve and Troy ParkPDF - 270.1KB
Heritage Property - The Cove, former housePDF - 98.0KB
Heritage Property - RAAF Aviation Heritage MuseumPDF - 288.8KB
Heritage Property - House 230 Preston Point RoadPDF - 129.6KB
Heritage Property - Memorial DrivePDF - 99.7KB
Heritage Property - Bicton Foreshore and ReservePDF - 164.5KB
Heritage Property - Workshop Leighton Panel and PaintPDF - 135.4KB
Heritage Property - Point Walter Reserve, including Point Walter Golf Course and Blackwall Reach ReservePDF - 580.6KB
Heritage Property - Point Walter former Army Camp Site including Watch HousePDF - 144.8KB
Heritage Property - Hammersmith HousePDF - 96.8KB
Heritage Property - Booragoon LakePDF - 191.4KB
Heritage Property - Booragoon Scar TreePDF - 115.5KB
Heritage Property - Grasmere HomesteadPDF - 182.4KB
Heritage Property - Bateman ReservePDF - 247.8KB
Heritage Property - Rookwood Street Jetty and ForeshorePDF - 183.3KB
Heritage Property - Swan River Rowing ClubhousePDF - 96.2KB
Heritage Property - Blue Gum ReservePDF - 175.5KB
Heritage Property - Deep Water Point Reserve, including Jetty and Sculpture ParkPDF - 102.5KB
Heritage Property - Quenda WetlandPDF - 200.3KB
Heritage Property - Shops and HousesPDF - 88.7KB
Heritage Property - Shop and House, Carrington StPDF - 160.5KB
Heritage Property - Original Melville Roads Board BuildingPDF - 138.4KB
Heritage Property - Miller Bakehouse Museum and ParkPDF - 106.4KB
Heritage Property - Palmyra Primary SchoolPDF - 177.8KB
Heritage Property - House, 60 Petra St, PalmyraPDF - 104.7KB
Heritage Property - Fremantle Cemetery and HousePDF - 235.5KB
Heritage Property - Police Houses and Lock UpPDF - 206.8KB
Heritage Property - House, 27 Hammad St, PalmyraPDF - 96.7KB
Heritage Property - House, 25 Hammad St, PalmyraPDF - 97.5KB
Heritage Property - Miller HousePDF - 108.2KB
Heritage Property - House, 19 McKimmie Rd, PalmyraPDF - 102.8KB
Heritage Property - House, 46 Mckimmie Road, PalmyraPDF - 101.9KB
Heritage Property - House, 46 Zenobia St, PalmyraPDF - 85.9KB
Heritage Property - Corner Shop and House 63 McKimmie RoadPDF - 65.7KB
Heritage Property - House, 33 Zenobia Street, PalmyraPDF - 64.4KB
Heritage Property - House, 66 Zenobia Street, PalmyraPDF - 73.0KB
Heritage Property - House, 54 Carrington St PalmyraPDF - 71.7KB
Heritage Property - House, 5 Adrian St, PalmyraPDF - 80.9KB
Heritage Property - House, 3 Adrian St, PalmyraPDF - 88.7KB
Heritage Property - House, 26 Harris St, PalmyraPDF - 76.0KB
Heritage Property - House, 7 Palin St, PalmyraPDF - 73.7KB
Heritage Property - House, 32 Zenobia St, PalmyraPDF - 94.5KB
Heritage Property - Piney Lakes ReservePDF - 246.9KB
Heritage Property - Lemon Scented Gum TreesPDF - 860.7KB

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a Local Heritage Survey?

Local Heritage Surveys (formerly known as Local Government Inventories, Municipal Inventories or Municipal Heritage Inventories) are buildings or places which, in the opinion of the local government, are of cultural heritage significance.

Local Heritage Surveys can help us work with private owners to manage heritage places. Surveys are complied to “tell the stories” of their districts, rather than serve as blunt instruments for control of development. 

What's the difference between the Local Government Inventory and the Heritage List?

Surveys are complied to “tell the stories” of their districts, rather than serve as instruments for control of development. 

A survey makes management recommendations.  There are no binding implications for owners, who are free to develop their properties in accordance with the normal planning scheme provisions which apply to all properties in the City. 

As part of the listing process, the history of each place is carefully researched. You may find out some interesting things about your property should it be included!

The Heritage List is different. This list is part of the City’s planning scheme and it comprises the best of places in the Local Heritage Survey. Properties on the Heritage List have significant heritage value and are worthy of some protection. A wide range of development options remains possible under these listings.

Only fully informed and consenting owners would have properties listed in the scheme. 

 Local Heritage SurveyHeritage List
Heritage Management RecommendationsYesYes
Need for formal development applicationNot beyond normal requirementsYes for some works such as demolition
Funding/subsidiesNoNo
Free development advice from heritage specialistPossible by appointmentPossible by appointment
What's Cultural Heritage Significance?

Cultural Heritage Significance is the aesthetic, historic, scientific or social significance a place may have for present and future generations. Cultural heritage extends beyond buildings and can include landscapes, artefacts and cultural institutes.  We recognize a broad scope of listings, from landscape features and parks to historic buildings or structures.

Why does the City have a Local Heritage Survey?

Every local government in Western Australia is required under Part 8 of the Heritage Act 2018’  to prepare a list of places of local heritage significance. The Heritage Council ‘Guidelines for Local Heritage Surveys’  recommend period reviews of the Local Heritage Survey every 5-8 years for local governments with ongoing urban development such as the City of Melville. As our last such document dates to 2014, it’s time for us to prepare an updated version.

What does it mean when my place is entered into the Local Heritage Survey?

As we’ve mentioned, inventories are complied to “tell the stories” of their districts. They don’t have any power to control development.

That means a listing on the Local Government Inventory doesn’t have any implications for owners, who are free to develop their properties in accordance with the normal planning scheme provisions which apply to all properties in the City. As part of the listing process, the history of each place is carefully researched by a heritage expert. You may find out some interesting things about your property if this happens!

What if I'd like to see the heritage qualities of my property better respected?

You should consider nominating your place for the Heritage List.

What about the State Register of Heritage Places?

Just as the listing of a place in the Local Heritage Survey is recognition of the importance of a place to the local district, the listing of a place on the State Register recognises the significance of a place to the whole of the state of Western Australia. 

Only places of exceptional value in fine condition are recognised on the State Register.  Local examples include Heathcote, the Applecross District Hall, Wireless Hill Park and the Miller Bakehouse. 

The development and even the maintenance of State Registered places are carefully guided by the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage.  While this sounds onerous to some at first, there are many benefits for owners, including significantly higher property values, and the prestige associated with owning buildings of recognised heritage value.

The State Register of Heritage Places is administered by the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage. Completely independent from the City, this department determines the suitability a nominated place for inclusion on the State Register. 

It’s entirely possible for a place to be listed in the Local Heritage Survey, the City’s planning scheme, and on the State Register at the same time.

Can a place be listed in the Local Heritage Survey or on the Heritage List without the owner’s consent?

No, the City won’t usually list a place if the owner objects. The only exceptions are for places of exceptional heritage significance.

Having said that, there’s no need to fear a listing should it be suggested as there are no formal development restrictions that follow from the Local Heritage Survey. Indeed, a listing may well be the perfect opportunity for an owner to learn more about the history of his or her property, and receive free of charge, expert guidance in its restoration and/or improvement!

The City of Melville has adopted an open and transparent approach to the Local Heritage Survey, consulting with all affected owners.

There are many stages in consultation. Owners of properties proposed for listing are individually consulted, and the wider community is consulted more broadly. Councillors will examine the issues raised during consultation and make decisions if necessary.

Who can nominate a place for listing and what is the process?

Any member of the community can nominate a place for inclusion on the Local Government Inventory.  Just be sure to reach us by 21 June 2019.

Your submission does not need to be more than a paragraph or two. Start with your full name, and your interest in the place you’re nominating. Are you the owner, for example?

We’ll also need the address of the place, plus a short description of it. The best submissions give us a sense of why the place might have heritage significance to the area. Here’s an example:

I’m JC Smith, owner of the dwelling at 299 Sample Street, Sampleton. My house dates to the 1920s and is in excellent condition, with most of the original materials intact. Our records show that the house originally belonged to Mr Bignotes, who owned the general store on nearby Corner Street for 30 years.

Should a place be considered significant, the City of Melville will contact the owner of the place nominated and seek their consent to list.

Once the public consultation period is closed and further research is complete, a final version of the Local Heritage Survey and Heritage List will be put to Council for adoption.

We’ll then make the final Local Heritage Survey available for public perusal at the Civic Centre and at our libraries.  A copy of the survey is also forwarded to the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage.

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